CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 76.09% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

76.09% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.

How to calculate the size of a position (CFDs)

You purchase 1 CFD on the ASX 200 at an index level of 5,750.

1 Point (of the above 5,750) is equal to 1 AUD.

This means you will make 1 AUD for every point the index rises and lose 1 AUD for every point the index falls.

For example, using the above data, if the index rose 100%, the profit would be AUD 5,750, so 100% of the position is AUD 5,750 which is the total position size.

If the one point was worth AUD 10, then the position size for one CFD would be AUD 57,500. If one point was worth AUD 25, then the exposure for one CFD would be 5,750 x 25, or AUD 143,750.

Alternative calculations:

In some cases, the minimum tick size is measured in movements that occur to the right of the decimal place.

For example, the minimum tick value for CFDs on the S&P500 is often 0.1 points or 0.01 points.

If the S&P500 is trading at 2,660 and the tick size is 0.1, with a tick value of $1, then one CFD is worth 2,660 x10 x $1, or $26,660.

If the tick size was 0.01 and a tick was worth $1, then one CFD would be worth 2,660 x 100 x $1, or $266,600.

That may seem very high, but in reality, one tick is often worth only $0.1 or $0.01.